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federal laws about desecrating national parks. and something else which was startling to me at first. i did not know what the grapes for trying to tell me a first. and what i realized and will allow the people who come and go up to the top of cadillac mountain and look out over what is essentially a big spruce forest did not realize is that the grapes were there before the spruce forest. and if you go back to the history, you find that. by about the year 1880, more than half of the island had been deforested. and along the edges any place that could grow hay or any kind of crops in the short growing season was used to create food for draft animals and food for people. and i realized that there were some enormous changes in the land that had not really thought about. and then i happened to stumble upon william cronin's book by the same name, changes in the land. when i came back from asia in the 80's i went back to michigan, where i grew up. i -- having this in mind, i saw these enormous changes in the landscape or grow. it was full of small family flowers in those days but no in the 80'
of not enforcing the law against small transactions so you think about it being legal in the front door of a coffee shop. but it's still illegal to produce and to sell the marijuana to those coffee shops so it's actually illegal. so what that does is it in place the price. so where was passed in washington and colorado it would allow for-profit companies to come produce and it's very different. it's just very different from other terms that gets thrown around like decriminalization. a lot of people use legalization and decriminalization interchangeably in that's incorrect. that just means lowering the penalties for possession, taking it from being a misdemeanor to a citation. when people talk about decriminalization that has nothing to do with production and distribution. that is why legalization and what happened in colorado and washington is so significant. >> host: what does it cost government, the federal government to having marijuana be illegal, enforcement and incarceration? >> guest: that's a great question. i don't know what it is for the federal government at some of the research we did i
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
and actually really happy to see how quickly law enforcement got on top of it and hold pulled it together so incredibly quickly and got the people apprehended them and they were captured in a matter of days. that actually made me feel so much more secure and so much better and i was really applauding the fbi and all the police that were working together and how everybody seemed to be reacting differently to those then 9/11. there was less feared and more rallying and they were not going to let them do this. on the other hand as my job i was watching the friends ask in the technology that they were using and i was fascinated. the infrared helicopters that they could watch the motions of the guy in the boat the fact that there was let in a sabha campus moving. i need to pick those things up for my writing and i know that sounds horrible but i'm listening as a human being and listening as a writer. i couldn't help the reality is that i thought it was fascinating and horrifying. >> having spent a number of years writing about a manhunt, i also found the tactics of this manhunt quite interesting.
in cleveland working for a law firm, and this next call comes from bobby in ohio. >> caller: i've got a question for you in regards to the comment you made about rg 3:and the article about him being called an uncle tom. why would you state that person saying that would be republican? wouldn't democrats actually sometimes have feelings like that? i'm a republican, and i don't feel that way towards rg iii, so i'm just curious why you would say that. >> guest: you either misunderstood what i said, or i said it badly. what i said was the espn guy criticized rg iii because he thought he was republican. he said there's a rumor he's republican, i don't know about that. he's got a white fiancee, i don't know about that. he called him a cornball brother because he suspected that rg iii was a republican, but he had a white fiancee. that is why this caster called him a cornball brother which i think is a racist thing. so i'm sorry if i misexplained it. >> host: go ahead, bobby, you're still on the line. >> caller: i appreciate that. i agree the same way you do then. i think it's totally a racist
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
that information, they will gather it whether or not you're aware of it. but all we're doing is permitting our law enforcement officers from having, you know, the tools to go after people who are getting guns illegally, buying them at gun shows and things like that. so one of the things we have to be careful about is that these inauthentic arguments sort of spread through the media, and they spread -- you know, one of the things i talk about in the book is that the fragmentation of media gives consumers more power than ever. you may not feel that way, but you have more power now than media consumers have ever had in history because you can choose where you're going to see something, when you're going to see something, and the technology exists to tabulate that. if you go to a web site, if you go to youtube, if you go to hulu, here or there, people will see that, and can they will know. ten years ago if you weren't in the nielsen family, nobody knew whether or not you were. watching television, and they didn't care. now there are a bunch of different ways for you to express your opinion about what'
of law, but this is the last one i read and then move it to q&a. it is simply live with the book but i hope to get out of it. the purpose of this book is twofold. to familiarize the american public and decision-makers, specifically the senior war college and to encourage discussion on how to improve the education of their important missions. the latter sense of the idea that there's room for improvement. cocos must be clear. whether war college goals are clear and whether articulated goals are supported by practices and processes that these institutions as part of the discussion. admiral james stafford is provided to think or take a nation of busy of for college education goes up to 2011 national war college convocation by describing this situation when he arrived at national in 1991. quote, i knew it i was good at and what i do well, driving a destroyer or crusader, leading a boarding party with a surrogate mother, landed in an air defense. beating sailors on the deck leadership, but fails to sense what i did not know or understand well. global politics and grand strategy, importance
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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